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Tāmaki herehere nga waka

Tāmaki Youth Wellbeing Collective – Rākau Tautoko
10 August
| Panmure

DESCRIPTION
Placemaking at ‘Tāmaki herehere ngā waka’.
One reference to our place. Tāmaki that binds many canoes. The destination of voyagers.
We re-connected with the whakatauki ‘Tāmaki herehere ngā waka – one of our more powerful references for our community. Participants brainstormed ideas on what we could create in Panmure for community members to stop and join in on. We used the placemaking kit to spark ideas and add more layers onto those ideas. We then grouped the ideas into themes and gave the restriction of ability to be actioned today, within walking distance. Once we had some themes, we worked out what we wanted to keep – something for people to add to, something that shows the history of many waka that gather and connect, something that helps people to connect with each other.

HOW
The Tāmaki Youth Wellbeing Collective were putting together a Youth Symposium and we wanted to add into the day, some real life projects that we could jump in to and help young people either grow and build themselves, or give back to the community. We decided on placemaking as a tool to help our youth to grow as well as give back to their community. We gathered young people, and community workers that worked together, learned what our whakatauki meant to our community, and how it related to us – from our past, into our present and for our future. Our kōrero about our whakatauki shared pride in our ancestors for their ingenuity for trading and connection between each other. We wanted to share that in what ever we created. We also wanted to encourage others to follow our ancestors ways, sharing connections and trading what we have. We decided on an interactive art piece on a wall in our town centre, where community members could share who they were, where they came from, and how their journey has been, in coming to our community today. We used some chalk from our placemaking kit, found a wall and got drawing!
We now have been given the opportunity to expand on our placemaking, with a grant from Panuku, to continue to create more placemaking opportunities in Panmure. Our aspiration is to take our first prototype, expand on our idea, and hopefully create something more permanent in our community.

VALUES
Tino Rangatiratanga, Whānaungatanga, Whakapapa

OUTCOME / RESULTS
We decided to create a temporary mural of a waka that held questions to prompt passerbys to join in and share their journey.
– Young people connected and taking ownership of their own community
– Sharing of the history of the local community
– Encouraging local community members to learn and connect with each other

BUDGET / FUNDER
Tāmaki Youth Wellbeing Collective supported this project with their volunteers through their Tāmaki Youth Symposium.

 
 

 
 

Stress-free zone in the Japanese Garden

Yana Kirakovskaya, Papaya Stories Ltd
www.papayastories.com
October 2018 | The Japanese Garden, Henderson

DESCRIPTION
The Japanese Garden is a sacred beauty on its own. Our vision wasn’t about creating something brand new rather amplifying the existing goodness that this place has to offer. The conceptual foundation of the stress-free zone is based on human senses (vision, sound, touch, smell, intuition) and using the garden gifts to actualise this or that sense. Therefore we came up with an idea of exploring the garden through the Sensual Walk. We designed a Site Map, marked areas in the garden where this or that sense can be easily activated. We wrote down the instructions on the back of the map how people can experience the sense and garden differently.
We ran the activation throughout the working week with the aim to attract the office workers, students from the High School to come down for the break from work and unwind in the garden. We run various wellbeing workshops based on the Japanese Practices - learning the Japanese calligraphy; making origami; singing bowls and Tai-chi movement meditation - during the lunch breaks from Wednesday to Friday to invite the office workers to use the space and do the activities that are meant to reduce the stress during the working hours.

HOW
We had a team of 7 who had various responsibilities and talents that they could apply to prepare for the activation. We organised a few team meetings to brainstorm on ideas what we would like to have in each of senses section. Then we came up with the list of materials required for each section that we were able to source out from the friends & family as well as opshops to keep the expenses to the low. For example, inspiring books that touch your soul were mainly sourced out from various opshops around Auckland. We made over 150 origami cranes to hang around the space that elevated the inspiring vibe in the garden and brought more colour. We used magazines and newspaper as origami paper and asked each team member to make 20-30 origami cranes, we had to produce over 80 inspiring for our "tree of wisdom" so asked each of the team member to come up with 15-20 quotes. It was a collective effort that required the serious planning, team management and project management skills were required to ensure we can set the activation up. We required 4 weeks of work to make deliver the activation starting from ideation to the last step of implementation. We also had to run this concept through the council department to sign it off and make sure that we will preserve the state of the garden, organise the waste management during the activation.

VALUES
Reduce the stress and improve the wellbeing in the area.

OUTCOME / RESULTS
The Japanese Garden has become more used during the working week and our activation provided the community members with the step-by-step wellbeing guidance how to improve their health during the working week. The audience kept coming back to the garden after the activation as well which is a positive result.

BUDGET / FUNDER
Self-funded initiative, 7 team members, spent $600

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The Family Tree

Yana Kirakovskaya, Papaya Stories Ltd
www.papayastories.com
15-17 May 2019 | Te Wero Island, Wynyard Quarter

DESCRIPTION
Inspired by Whanau, Aiga, Family, our Family Tree was be planted on Te Wero Island on Wednesday 15th – 17th of May 2019 to celebrate the International Day of Families along with the International Day of Light, Living in Peace. The idea behind the tree was simple. Our colourful branches represent New Zealand past ancestors, multicultural society of the present day and future generations. Despite different colours and patterns on the tree, the branches look the same from the inside. Same applies to people, despite our external differences, we are all the same underneath – human beings who crave belonging, connection and love. Standing together, reaching out for light and growth, we can achieve the real equilibrium. We invited everyone to be a part of this activation by sharing a family story, photo or small note about their cultural or family roots. Those stories turned into the leaves that brought much more meaning and beauty to the life of tree.

HOW
We started with the research of the space and generating ideas of what can be done for the international family day. The tree turned out to be a great multi-faceted symbol that we decided to use and explore in our activation. We did research on multiple tree designs and thought of creating our own tree that would be easy to set up and adjust to the location. Also we need to think about the weather conditions and make the tree stable if it gets too windy. Because our tree has a storytelling purpose we thought of setting up the storytelling corner with proper school chairs, writing kits and inspiring notes, stickers that people might use while writing their stories. We believe that little details matter, so we wanted to give a Te Wero Island space a homy cozy feel which we achieved by bringing the pieces of furniture, blankets and other accessories from our places. To make the DIY we required over 10 days of work. We went to collect the broken tree branches and bought the knitting threads to wrap it around the branches. We made over 10 hand-made branches that required over 50 hours of work, so it was very time consuming. The set up / pack down of the tree wasn't hard at all, most of the time we spent on producing and real making the tree itself, the rest of the details was just organisational stuff and getting materials required for the storytelling corner and instamix photos.

VALUES
Community, unity and promote family values.

OUTCOME / RESULTS
It was very special to see how many people from different walks in life felt encouraged to share their story. When the beauty meets your eye and the message hits your heart, no language barriers, socio-economic background really matters. Love wins. Despite the fact that the activation was held during the working days, we managed to capture over 60 stories capturing families stories and photos from all over the world including such countries as Cuba, Spain, France, Belgium, Australia, Ukraine, England, Germany, USA, Mexico, China, Thailand, Samoa, Fiji, New Caledonia and many more.

 
 

 

Pop-Up Dog Playground

Jia Luo
Nov 2018 - Jan 2019 (2 months) | Basque Park Eden Terrace

DESCRIPTION
I created a temporary dog obstacle course using upcycled pallets for my local park, which is popular with locals and their dogs.

HOW
Sourced pallets from industrial areas for free. Asked friends to volunteer tools and time for production over a period of a week. Continuous engagement and consultation with park users daily to refine outcome.

VALUES
Social connection, visual spectacle, strengthening the feeling of a shared backyard.

OUTCOME / RESULTS
The activation was successful in that the obstacle course was used regularly throughout the summer months by dogs and their owners as well as children in the area. Feedback from park goers was very positive – they liked the bright colours and enjoyed the temporary structures as a playfully casual way to connect with other park goers. The obstacle course components were used as tables for gatherings and shared lunches/afternoon tea between the neighbours.

BUDGET / FUNDER
No budget

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Sunday Best

Jessica Rose
Auckland Tweed Run
Tāmaki MakaUrau – Auckland Central

DESCRIPTION
Organised a team of placemakers to create a guided fancy dress bike ride, starting at the Akl Domain and ending in a picnic at the Parnell Rose Gardens. At the start we had Vintage photography, food trucks, and bike hire. The ride was to empower people with the courage to use the road network and to show that there are a number of people who choose to use a bicycle, that would benefit from a safe path to use it on. We concluded with a band, picnic rugs, and refreshments in the public rose gardens.

VALUES
Climate Action, Community, Sustainable Transport, Fun, Safety and claiming the street.

OUTCOME / RESULTS
Bike paths on city streets, especially along K rd and Ponsonby. People feeling that they could wear what they wanted while on a bike. People meeting like minded people, people using and activating public spaces. We expected 90 people and got 300!

BUDGET / FUNDER
$500 from Auckland Transport. If I were to do it today I would go for a multi board grant!

TIMEFRAME
This was a one day event, although organisation takes 8 weeks, approx. 2015 (there was a 2016 one, and it got rained on, and a 2017 one that got cancelled).

 
 

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Collaborative Street Art Project

Jesse Jensen / ARES ARTIFEX
Otahuhu

DESCRIPTION
I organised to paint this mural in Otahuhu in collaboration with Otahuhu Business Association and Manukau Beautification Trust.

HOW
I contacted the local high school and six students joined me over the school holidays to paint this large mural in the town centre.

VALUES
Beautification and cultural expression.

OUTCOME / RESULTS
Students mentored in a professional creative environment. Artists gaining exposure. A lasting legacy for the community – exposed to artwork in a non-gallery setting.

BUDGET / FUNDER
Local rate payers

TIMEFRAME
Took about 3 weeks to complete.

 
 

 
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Neighbourly Park Festival

Boopsie Maran / Places for Good
Ponsonby

DESCRIPTION
We created a simple pop up activation full of comfortable seating and live music in a very public park that is often empty and quiet. We wanted people to remember how nice it is lay in the sun and bump into neighbours and tourist while having a bit of fun. Our organisation places a high priority on facilitating projects that reflects the neighbourhoods they are meant to serve. There also needs to be that atmosphere where people both stumble into it and unintentionally find themselves never wanting to leave.

HOW
We did this by adding a Ramen food truck, Kombucha stand, and a live jazz band that normally can only be heard in private restaurants and venues. We also partnered with the toy library, fairy shop, and Samoa house library to add a bit of local fun for children and families. The favourite additions were a weaver that was set up to teach people how to make putiputi (flowers) and the bean bags rented from bean boy. We must mention the borrowed stage, tables, and chairs from our countless volunteers.
The most difficult part of the event was acquiring power for the speakers and receiving our council permit by deadline. These two problems were alleviated by constant contact with local council regarding permitting restrictions and last minute financial support from the local business association to pay for generators.

VALUES
Whanaungatanga

OUTCOME / RESULTS
I created a full report in a slide presentation that I presented to both the Local Board and Governing Body. I hope that in the future small neighbourly festivals are easier and less regulated. Since, my report the local board is actively seeking a reliable power source for future events in a number of public venues. Furthermore many of the vendors that met at this event now collaborate on a regular basis. This is my favourite part.

BUDGET / FUNDER
$1,200

TIMEFRAME
Applied for a council event permit in October 2018. Event completed Feb 2019. Actual execution for 90% of project coordinating was completed 3 days prior to the event once permit was completely signed off. We would do it all again because our priority is that anyone can create that sense of community and place where everyone contributes and participates in their own special unique way in a safe inclusive environment they belong to. For this particular activation we intended to create a local walkable hub of connection through humans, food, and the arts.